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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2015 1:26 pm 
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Hallo again and thank you for your answers.

I have one more question. i know dates are high in sugar, but Tom said if you eat the whole fruit it's no problem, except you eat too much of it (like his ten apple excample). Or is the problem with dates because it's dried? Does drying raise the sugar levels? Now i use the almond milk without the dates.

I am just reading Eat to Live and ordered the soup base and the matozest of him to give the soup a little bit mor taste. Now that i got it, i see that even there sugar is added. Datesugar! <1 gram per serving. So i have to send it back. So it's a little bit complicated at the beginning, but step for step i'm coming further to my goals.

Greetings Tim


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2015 5:34 pm 
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I do eat fresh dates sometimes. But I eat one or maybe two. They don't seem to bother me. Now, if I eat a lot of watermelon, or pineapple, the high sugar content of those fruits will bother me.


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:29 pm 
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You might find the following list of relative sugar content for fruit of interest.

1. Berries - Berries are, in general, the fruits lowest in sugar -- and also among the highest in antioxidants and other nutrients.

2. Summer Fruits - Melons, peaches, nectarines, and apricots are next in sugar-order.

3. Winter Fruits - Apples, pears, and citrus fruit are moderate in sugars.

4. Tropical Fruits - Pineapple, pomegranates, mangoes, bananas, and fresh figs are high in sugar (guava and papaya are lower than the others).

5. Dried Fruit - Dates, raisins, apricots, prunes, figs, and most other dried fruits are extremely high in sugar. Dried cranberries and blueberries would be lower, except that a lot of sugar is usually added to combat the tartness.

It should be noted however that the dried fruits do not have more sugar than that that same fruit when fresh. what happens when they are dehydrated is that the sugar 'density' soars. So a reasonable serving of grapes as perhaps a cup if eaten fresh if instead were eaten as raisins in an equal volume of one cup means that the calories approximately quadruple by comparison. The single cup of raisins comes from four cups of grapes.

Ted


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:25 am 
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Ted Vollers wrote:Remember that there is a considerable distinction between bread and whole grains or coarsely ground whole grains. Bread is largely very fine ground white or brown unbleached wheat flour so it is digested rapidly as basically sugar like, a carbohydrate. Then there is the substantial sugar in most any bread. The sugar must be there to raise the bread by the action of yeast producing carbon dioxide, which needs the sugar to do so. So count bread like sugar.

Whole grain, even ground some, is nothing like white flour and does not act like sugar. It takes effort and time on the part of your digestive system to digest it so there is no sugar high.
Ted
How about whole grain bread? Would you still count it like sugar?

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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2015 12:30 pm 
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Just look at the label and see how much sugar is listed. Most bread has quite a bit of sugar - it's what makes the yeast work.
The sprouted grain bread (Ezekial) is the lowest in sugar, I think.


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2015 12:54 pm 
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Mike,

Linda covered this in basic terms, but since I had this largely finished, I'm posting it anyway.

I cook in a microwave with water, whole grain coarse ground cereals, mixed grains or old fashioned oatmeal, to make a hot cereal or porridge which is slow to digest because of the coarseness, digested further and the coarseness broken down by your gut bacteria. They are coarse and require cooking this way to soften them and make them edible. Even so called whole grain bread has only part of its constituents as coarse ground grain and from what I see in stores, mostly that is a garnish on the top crust. When they talk whole grain, they mean that the whole grain is included but only some small percentage will be coarsely ground from the bran and the germ. The bulk of the loaf must be in the form of wheat or other gluten (the grain protein) containing flour including finely ground flour from the core of the grain or it cannot rise to make bread. Gluten, found only in wheat varieties, barley, rye and triticale, is what makes dough sticky so that it can hold together to make the tiny bubbles containing the carbon dioxide that the yeast creates as it ferments in the bread dough. otherwise those small bubbles pop, grow into a big bubble which pops and the bread slumps into a slab. That's why a slice has all those small holes in the bread. You form it into a loaf and let it rise first on your kneading board or in a bowl and then punch it down and divide it into the loaf pans and let it rise again. The second rising is the important one to getting a bread loaf instead of a slab of cooked dough. It's the finely ground gluten containing flour part, the yeast and the sugar required to feed the yeast to do this rising, that amounts to the actual sugar and the readily digested, sugar like carbohydrate of the fine flour. You would have to make a direct comparison of the labeling of this kind of bread with more conventional bread to see what the actual difference is in each case, if they tell you on the label. That is how I understand it and my experience with baking my own bread in the past.

An alternative bread with which I have almost no experience is what is called a 'sourdough' bread in which you traditionally keep a sourdough starter in a jar in your refrigerator or just on the shelf between bread batches consisting of not yeast, except for stray wild yeast floating in the environment, but bacteria to cause the bread rising as it gives off gas. You build up your small starter batch with added flour and water to grow more bacteria containing starter which you incorporate into your bread dough to make it rise instead of using bread yeast. You still need a gluten containing flour to make the bubbles or it won't rise. You save back some of the starter to make the starter for the next bread batch. And if you don't have the right bacteria, lactobacillus, you don't get good and edible bread. Sourdough starter is usually purchased now but you can start your own and hope that you get good bacteria. Have you ever heard the term sourdough used for the prospectors in the 'old west' or Alaska? This is the kind of bread they had to make because yeast and sugar were in short supply. Sourdough tends to give you a sour bread, hence the name, as you don't have to add sugar to feed yeast but rather the bacteria can eat and digest the flour carbohydrate and protein and thus produce the carbon dioxide to raise the bread into a loaf. This kind of bread should not have quite the sugar load, but still you must have fine flour that still will give some carbohydrate high like sugar.

Ted


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2015 2:36 pm 
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I think added sugar in bread is predominantly an American phenomenon.

Here's the ingredients list of a popular brand of mass produced bread from a New Zealand supermarket: Water, Wheat Flour, Mixed Grains (24%) (Wheat, Rye), Skim Milk Powder, Wheat Gluten, Iodised Salt, Vinegar, Yeast.

The actual sugar content of this bread is 3.2g per 100g which comes from the lactose in the milk powder.


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:02 am 
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Sainbury wrote:Just look at the label and see how much sugar is listed. Most bread has quite a bit of sugar - it's what makes the yeast work.
The sprouted grain bread (Ezekial) is the lowest in sugar, I think.
*smacks forehead* of course, somehow that slipped my mind. Thanks.

I like bread so much I was in my own belief trap about it. :(

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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:37 pm 
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Thanks Linda! And thank you Ted for the list! Will be helpful.
It's a bit difficult to get routine in it with making purchases, but it almost reaches its destination. I'm making purchases once a week when a greengrocer who only sells organic fruit and veg is at a place near my home. For the (soup) veggies i already found out how much i have to buy to get through the week, but with my smoothie greens it's more complicated, because you cannot store green leaves for more than a few days. I think i have to buy all the things at once and directly make my smoothies for the whole week and store them in the refridgerator.
But i'm extreme motivated to pull through this sugar thing this time. This forum became a main motivator on my way and i'm really looking forward for personal results. So thanks all here!


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 7:56 am 
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Be aware that there may well be more sugar in bread than merely required for feeding the yeast.

In the documentaryBest Documentary 2015 - The Secrets Of Sugar - Science Channel National Geographic they discuss the 'bliss point', where sugar is added to maximally enhance taste.

There's lots more to be said about that aspect, but the US food chain, generally speaking, is rife with what I consider, unneeded sugar, as in the case of the bliss point application.


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 5:41 pm 
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Hi again.

Have a few questions again. I know white rice is bad for my diet, but i need something with high calories and protein, because i lost weight so fast. So i bought some ORYZA natural rice mixed with black wild rice. Is it okay, or can somebody say anything about it? Natural rice has Gi value of 50/54 and Wild rice GI value is 35. Second question is about liquorice root. I have a favourite tea which contains 25% of it, which gives it a nice sweet after taste. I googled, that liquorice root has a GI of 0 and is suitable for diabetics, so i think it should be no problem, especially in a tea.
And my last question is about xylitol. I know it was mentioned a few years ago in this forum, but nobody could say something about it. Maybe now, anybody here had experience with it. It has a GI value of 7 and is also suitable for diabetics.

Thanks for your help.


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 12:24 am 
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I love black rice. Some more info on the nutrional benefits can be found here:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_rice

Also: "Because the health benefits of black rice lie in the bran, it's important to choose whole-grain varieties when shopping. As with brown rice, Moore suggests, you should look for "whole black rice" at the top of the ingredients list."


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 3:33 am 
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I know that black rice would be best. But it is not available in regular stores here. Only the mix with brown rice. That's why it is so interesting for me, if natural/brown rice has any effect when i eat it (like the white rice). Or if it's fine with my sugarless diet.

Thank you!


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 8:52 am 
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Bruno - you could look at the glycemic index for the rice you are looking at and see what the number is.

Can you eat nuts? They are a high calorie food. Look through a few pages of this post and see what other people found to eat that had more calories. There were some other males with high metabolisms that had a hard time keeping weight on too.


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 Post subject: Re: Toms Diet
PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 10:52 am 
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There's some useful info here:
http://www.livestrong.com/article/28055 ... hite-rice/

My personal experience is that eating sushi made with brown rice leaves me feeling full for much longer than sushi made with white rice.


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