Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

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Keith at MBT Events
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by Keith at MBT Events »

"I suspect, however, that the typical physician does not know much about the effects of sugar on consciousness etc. I would look foolish explaining it to them." Yep.
Always take the advice from a medical doctor, though.
I see a Naturopath, ND, their view is slightly different.
"First of all, let me make one thing perfectly clear. I never explain anything." Mary Poppins
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Brubblon
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by Brubblon »

Just thought I post this for closure.

I got myself a blood sugar meter and measured my sugar levels at various times after different activities over the past few weeks. My blood sugar was always perfectly fine. (between 70 and 120)
I'm just wondering why my physician couldn't have made a quick blood sugar test with one of those meters. Oh well, I'm happy that I don't have to worry about that any more. This just goes to show that one shouldn't jump to conclusions too soon.

Or maybe we changed the probability of this occurrence and "turned" it into an error. In which case I guess I should say thanks.

Thanks and bye :)
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Sainbury
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by Sainbury »

Did you do a fasting blood test to check for cholesterol too? My blood sugar is also really low when I do one of those. It is usually because I eat early in the evening and then nothing until the blood test.

If you are getting hypoglycemic then sugar is the last thing you should eat. You need to eat small amounts of protein frequently during the day. That might be as simple as a handful of nuts.

Keep in mind that most doctors only have one course about nutrition in medical school and aren't much of a source for knowledge. You would be better talking to a sports therapy nutritionist if you have any problems in the future. If you feel fine then I wouldn't worry about it.
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Brubblon
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by Brubblon »

Sainbury,

thanks for your advice. They checked my cholesterol and it was fine. I think my blood sugar is totally fine, too. There must have been an error in the lab or my body did something exceptionally weird. I could not reproduce these low blood sugar levels with my own blood sugar meter. I checked it ten times.

I am about to take Keith's advice and see a naturopath because I am disappointed with the doctors I have been visiting. They are mostly about treating the symptoms and hush you through like a hot potato. I know it's not their fault because they have a full schedule. However, I get no explanation for the causes of the symptoms after waiting for hours in a germ infested waiting room. /rant
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Sainbury
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by Sainbury »

Interesting Article:

Here’s What Happens To Your Brain When You Give Up Sugar For Lent
http://www.iflscience.com/brain/here-s- ... sugar-lent


Anyone who knows me also knows that I have a huge sweet tooth. I always have. My friend and fellow graduate student Andrew is equally afflicted, and living in Hershey, Pennsylvania – the “Chocolate Capital of the World” – doesn’t help either of us.

But Andrew is braver than I am. Last year, he gave up sweets for Lent. I can’t say that I’m following in his footsteps this year, but if you are abstaining from sweets for Lent this year, here’s what you can expect over the next 40 days.

Sugar: natural reward, unnatural fix

In neuroscience, food is something we call a “natural reward.” In order for us to survive as a species, things like eating, having sex and nurturing others must be pleasurable to the brain so that these behaviors are reinforced and repeated.

Evolution has resulted in the mesolimbic pathway, a brain system that deciphers these natural rewards for us. When we do something pleasurable, a bundle of neurons called the ventral tegmental area uses the neurotransmitter dopamine to signal to a part of the brain called the nucleus accumbens. The connection between the nucleus accumbens and our prefrontal cortex dictates our motor movement, such as deciding whether or not to taking another bite of that delicious chocolate cake. The prefrontal cortex also activates hormones that tell our body: “Hey, this cake is really good. And I’m going to remember that for the future.”

Not all foods are equally rewarding, of course. Most of us prefer sweets over sour and bitter foods because, evolutionarily, our mesolimbic pathway reinforces that sweet things provide a healthy source of carbohydrates for our bodies. When our ancestors went scavenging for berries, for example, sour meant “not yet ripe,” while bitter meant “alert – poison!”

Fruit is one thing, but modern diets have taken on a life of their own. A decade ago, it was estimated that the average American consumed 22 teaspoons of added sugar per day, amounting to an extra 350 calories; it may well have risen since then. A few months ago, one expert suggested that the average Briton consumes 238 teaspoons of sugar each week.

Today, with convenience more important than ever in our food selections, it’s almost impossible to come across processed and prepared foods that don’t have added sugars for flavor, preservation, or both.

These added sugars are sneaky – and unbeknown to many of us, we’ve become hooked. In ways that drugs of abuse – such as nicotine, cocaine and heroin – hijack the brain’s reward pathway and make users dependent, increasing neuro-chemical and behavioural evidence suggests that sugar is addictive in the same way, too.

Sugar addiction is real

“The first few days are a little rough,” Andrew told me about his sugar-free adventure last year. “It almost feels like you’re detoxing from drugs. I found myself eating a lot of carbs to compensate for the lack of sugar.”

There are four major components of addiction: binging, withdrawal, craving, and cross-sensitisation (the notion that one addictive substance predisposes someone to becoming addicted to another). All of these components have been observed in animal models of addiction – for sugar, as well as drugs of abuse.

A typical experiment goes like this: rats are deprived of food for 12 hours each day, then given 12 hours of access to a sugary solution and regular chow. After a month of following this daily pattern, rats display behaviors similar to those on drugs of abuse. They’ll binge on the sugar solution in a short period of time, much more than their regular food. They also show signs of anxiety and depression during the food deprivation period. Many sugar-treated rats who are later exposed to drugs, such as cocaine and opiates, demonstrate dependent behaviors towards the drugs compared to rats who did not consume sugar beforehand.

Like drugs, sugar spikes dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Over the long term, regular sugar consumption actually changes the gene expression and availability of dopamine receptors in both the midbrain and frontal cortex. Specifically, sugar increases the concentration of a type of excitatory receptor called D1, but decreases another receptor type called D2, which is inhibitory. Regular sugar consumption also inhibits the action of the dopamine transporter, a protein which pumps dopamine out of the synapse and back into the neuron after firing.

In short, this means that repeated access to sugar over time leads to prolonged dopamine signalling, greater excitation of the brain’s reward pathways and a need for even more sugar to activate all of the midbrain dopamine receptors like before. The brain becomes tolerant to sugar – and more is needed to attain the same “sugar high.”

Sugar withdrawal is also real

Although these studies were conducted in rodents, it’s not far-fetched to say that the same primitive processes are occurring in the human brain, too. “The cravings never stopped, [but that was] probably psychological,” Andrew told me. “But it got easier after the first week or so.”

In a 2002 study by Carlo Colantuoni and colleagues of Princeton University, rats who had undergone a typical sugar dependence protocol then underwent “sugar withdrawal.” This was facilitated by either food deprivation or treatment with naloxone, a drug used for treating opiate addiction which binds to receptors in the brain’s reward system. Both withdrawal methods led to physical problems, including teeth chattering, paw tremors, and head shaking. Naloxone treatment also appeared to make the rats more anxious, as they spent less time on an elevated apparatus that lacked walls on either side.

Similar withdrawal experiments by others also report behavior similar to depression in tasks such as the forced swim test. Rats in sugar withdrawal are more likely to show passive behaviors (like floating) than active behaviors (like trying to escape) when placed in water, suggesting feelings of helplessness.

A new study published by Victor Mangabeira and colleagues in this month’s Physiology & Behavior reports that sugar withdrawal is also linked to impulsive behavior. Initially, rats were trained to receive water by pushing a lever. After training, the animals returned to their home cages and had access to a sugar solution and water, or just water alone. After 30 days, when rats were again given the opportunity to press a lever for water, those who had become dependent on sugar pressed the lever significantly more times than control animals, suggesting impulsive behavior.

These are extreme experiments, of course. We humans aren’t depriving ourselves of food for 12 hours and then allowing ourselves to binge on soda and doughnuts at the end of the day. But these rodent studies certainly give us insight into the neuro-chemical underpinnings of sugar dependence, withdrawal, and behavior.

Through decades of diet programs and best-selling books, we’ve toyed with the notion of “sugar addiction” for a long time. There are accounts of those in “sugar withdrawal” describing food cravings, which can trigger relapse and impulsive eating. There are also countless articles and books about the boundless energy and new-found happiness in those who have sworn off sugar for good. But despite the ubiquity of sugar in our diets, the notion of sugar addiction is still a rather taboo topic.

Are you still motivated to give up sugar for Lent? You might wonder how long it will take until you’re free of cravings and side-effects, but there’s no answer – everyone is different and no human studies have been done on this. But after 40 days, it’s clear that Andrew had overcome the worst, likely even reversing some of his altered dopamine signalling. “I remember eating my first sweet and thinking it was too sweet,” he said. “I had to rebuild my tolerance.”

And as regulars of a local bakery in Hershey – I can assure you, readers, that he has done just that.
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Ted Vollers
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by Ted Vollers »

Science is beginning to confirm Tom Campbell's statements about sugar and its effects. This has not reached the situation of established consensus, but check out this article of some recent research.

Here's Why Cutting Sugar Intake Is Sweet For Your Child's Health
By Katrina Pascual, Tech Times, October 30, 2015
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/10131 ... health.htm
Sugar is bad news, as one new study from University of California San Francisco and Touro University California researchers showed. But what actually happens to a child’s body when there’s high sugar intake and when the sweet stuff is removed from diet?

According to Dr. Jean-Marc Schwarz, senior author of the study, when sugar was taken out of the diets of the 43 child subjects, they began to heed their bodies’ satiety clues, or know when they were full or hungry. Some even felt like they were being provided so much food, wrote the authors.

During the nine-day sugar-restricted trial, some kids reported they were being overwhelmed even if they consumed the same number of calories they do at home – sugar was controlled while fat, protein, carbohydrates and calorie levels were maintained.
And earlier and even more in line with Tom's concerns regarding interfering with meditation effects.
4 Ways Sugar Could Be Harming Your Mental Health
By David Sack M.D., Psychology Today, Posted Sep 02, 2013
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/wh ... tal-health
Most people know that eating too much dessert and processed food can contribute to physical health problems like obesity and type 2 diabetes. Far less attention has been given to the impact of a high-sugar diet on mental health, though numerous studies have shown the deleterious effects a sweet tooth can have on mood, learning and quality of life. In addition to inflating waistlines, sugar and other sweeteners, including high fructose corn syrup, honey, molasses and maple syrup, may contribute to a number of mental health problems:

#1 Depression

The roller coaster of high blood sugar followed by a crash may accentuate the symptoms of mood disorders. Research (link is external) has tied heavy sugar consumption to an increased risk of depression and worse outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. There are a couple theories explaining the link. Sugar suppresses activity of a hormone called BDNF that is low in individuals with depression and schizophrenia. Sugar is also at the root of chronic inflammation, which impacts the immune system, the brain and other systems in the body and also has been implicated in depression. Interestingly, countries with high sugar intake also have a high rate (link is external) of depression.

#2 Addiction

Although controversial, a growing body of evidence points to the addictive potential of sugar. Both drugs and, to a lesser extent, sugar and processed junk foods flood the brain with the feel-good chemical dopamine, over time changing the function of the brain. In a study (link is external) by researchers at Yale University, the simple sight of a milkshake activated the same reward centers of the brain as cocaine among people with addictive eating habits. A 2007 study (link is external) showed that rats actually prefer sugar water to cocaine. Rats given fatty and sugary products demonstrated classic symptoms (link is external) of addiction including tolerance and withdrawal symptoms when the products were taken away.

#3 Anxiety

The Standard American Diet, which is full of sugar and fat, does not necessarily cause anxiety but it does appear to worsen anxiety symptoms and impair the body’s ability to cope with stress. Individuals who suffer from panic attacks, for example, are hyper-alert to signs of impending danger. Sugar can cause blurry vision, difficulty thinking and fatigue, all of which may be interpreted as signs of a panic attack, thereby increasing worry and fear. A sugar high and subsequent crash can cause shaking and tension, which can make anxiety worse.

Research has established a correlation between sugar intake and anxiety. In a 2008 study (link is external), rats that binged on sugar and then fasted displayed anxiety, and in a 2009 study (link is external) rats fed sucrose compared to high-antioxidant honey were more likely to suffer anxiety. While dietary changes alone cannot cure anxiety, they can minimize symptoms, boost energy and improve the body’s ability to cope with stress.

#4 Learning and Memory

Sugar may also compromise cognitive abilities such as learning and memory. In an animal study (link is external) by the University of California Los Angeles, six weeks of taking a fructose solution (similar to soda) caused the rats to forget their way out of a maze, whereas rats that ate a nutritious diet and those that consumed a high-fructose diet that also included omega-3 fatty acids found their way out faster. The high sugar diet caused insulin resistance, which in turn damaged communications between brain cells that fuel learning and memory formation.

Recognizing these and other risks, the trends in sugar consumption seem to be changing. People are consuming less sugar – about 13 percent (link is external) of their daily calories – which is still far too much, but clear progress from 18 percent just over a decade ago. Our bodies were never intended to handle the amount of sugar that has become the norm in the American diet. At least now we’re beginning to recognize that the mind and body are intricately connected and both must be nurtured to achieve optimal health.
If sugar affects more gross aspects of your mental functioning in these ways, think of how it affects the more subtle effects involved with meditation and contact with the LCS.

Ted
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Re: Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Post by ahash31 »

Thanks for sharing this Zak.
Are you sure it was Adam really typing this? If it helps you out, does that even matter?
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