Book Three question about dead-ends

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Jaymee
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Book Three question about dead-ends

Post by Jaymee »

Every time I (re)read MBT I always stick on a particular passage in Book 3. It reads: "A projection of a fragment of your sentient consciousness into a space-time reality could get spiritually dead-ended in a situation where you believe that you do not have significant choices left -- you feel that you cannot produce uniquely useful or significant choices during future increments of DELTA-t. Under those circumstances, your inability to find a way out of the perceived dead end will typically cause you to find a way (perhaps a fatal disease or accident) to check out of, or shed, that particular reality."

Would a spiritual dead-end be something one would be aware of? An existential crisis or crossroads where one knows one is feeling dead-ended? Or would/could this occur without one's conscious recognition of such a state? If NPMRn is a spiritual (quality of consciousness) system "experimenting with the evolutionary potential of consciousness," does that mean that a "spiritual dead-end" is simply a lack of recognition of available significant choices to reduce one's entropy? Or is it something more concrete, perhaps a PMR b(i)ased sense of hopelessness that Tom means? Is it a general sense of malaise and non-effort that causes the system to pull the plug, so to speak? Or is this "check out" something one's consciousness is actively engaged in looking for, creating, attracting, etc. once it decides there are no other viable options?
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Ted Vollers
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Re: Book Three question about dead-ends

Post by Ted Vollers »

Jaymee,

Tom will have to add other nuances of meaning if he had a greater breadth of meaning in mind. "A projection of a fragment of your sentient consciousness into a space-time reality" refers to your virtual self participating in a VR such as PMR, not an NPMR type reality. You should not be getting into this kind of reaction in an NPMR VR experience which is understood to basically be continuous and without death. This could be a spiritual or existential dead end or simply a matter of seeing no hope for the future in a really bad living circumstance. This would be something that you were consciously aware of or it would not necessarily bother you. You would not normally be thinking in terms of reducing one's entropy in this kind of situation. If you knew enough to think in terms of reducing one's entropy, you would probably stick with the situation as understanding the way reality works better. It might well be a matter of lack of recognition of available significant choices or at least desirable ones.

You do not consciously think in terms like "I think I'll contract a cancer and die" or "I think I'll walk in front of a bus". You probably have heard the phrase, 'death wish' before, used to refer to someone who suddenly becomes recklessly careless or ignores signs of health problems. You may not have experienced a real depression, but those who do feel that there is nothing right, nothing ever will be right and I just wish it would all end. That is why they sometimes commit suicide or unconsciously seek another way out. That is not to say that one could in fact be unconscious of the situation either as much of our awareness is not at a clearly conscious level. Nor does it mean that you cannot simply have a sudden mental lapse.

I hope that this has covered all the bases with your questions and not added to the confusion.

Ted
Jaymee
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Re: Book Three question about dead-ends

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Ted, thank you for your response. I greatly enjoy reading your posts, website and your "dissertation" on VRRE.

My original post included a disclaimer to the effect of, "if one knows enough to use the phrase 'reduction of entropy', one might not likely find themselves in this position," but I deleted it before posting because it seemed obvious. However, upon further reflection I don't know if that is true. All over the place I see people (who have little interest or knowledge in consciousness systems) narrow their choices to nil and yet still go on. Everyone, at some point, has felt depression, separated in our experience of it only by degrees. Is it this intense feeling of hopelessness that Tom is referring to? If so, then I have merely overthought the passage and the simplest answer was the correct one.

However, I wonder if it is not, instead, that once one is aware of the goal of the system (entropy reduction), of which our PMR is a mere subset of NPMRn, one might experience a perceived lack of growth or lack of potential for growth that would lead to the dead-end result? And is this a function of the goal of the system? Or one (not)functioning within the goal of the system to bring about this result?
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Re: Book Three question about dead-ends

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For some reason I get the impression that this has to do with a sense of relevance, either within one's own life (feeling irrelevant) or perhaps perceived obsolence within the system. While this sense of irrelevance (no significant choices that would make any impact) could lead to depression or hopelessness, I do not think it is necessarily a byproduct of either of these.
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Ted Vollers
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Re: Book Three question about dead-ends

Post by Ted Vollers »

Jaymee,

One of the things that you (us in general) need to learn in addition to the goal of system and individual entropy reduction is that there are seldom such dead ends to which you refer, unless you are considering a personal dead end as a painful or degrading end by terminal illness or accidental result. Those who proceed through the system of PMR without a clue, no knowledge of the big picture at all, still are obtaining the benefit of the designed in entropy reduction process. It is an automatic result of taking the trip, whether blindly or knowingly. So some one embarked on an effort to seriously enter the 'big picture' should never assume that they know that there is no potential growth yet to come. We here are simply not in the position to know this with any certainty.

Having observed my mother, finally and knowingly faced with descent into the depths of Alzheimer's Disease, asking for permission to 'go home' and clearly getting it, obviously those without great commitment or knowledge of spiritual enlightenment but a more traditional religious understanding, can consciously opt out and get permission. The asking for and obtaining permission is the significant factor. So someone committed to understanding the big picture can of course also ask if it is not time to leave the stage, and given permission, an exit will be provided. The asking of permission is the important factor and then sticking with it based upon the answer. There is the potential for your remaining life to be of value to the system in the development of others and thus of positive growth for yourself as well, whether you can see it or not. Sort of like the joke that it is difficult to keep in mind that your plan was to drain the swamp when you are up to your ass in alligators. No matter who you are and how much you may learn, the system, as embodied in your guidance and NPMR in general has a greater perspective than you can have. So whatever the situation that you face or perceive yourself to face, do the best job of it as you can, interact on your best understanding and Intent with all those whom you encounter and depend on the Consciousness System to make the best use that it can of yourself and all of it's other resources as possible.

Ted
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Re: Book Three question about dead-ends

Post by ObjectiveMind »

Jaymee

In that part of Book 3, I know the statement and I believe that Tom says that it's a very very rare situation.

There is always opportunity in front of you to grow, a dead end is an extremely rare thing.

Walk out the door and interact. The possibilities are endless.
Invite your inlaws over for dinner or meet the cousin or neighbor you have been avoiding.
Volunteer for something, join a club, Drive to NYC in Rush hour traffic.
Mow your lawn and interact with the gnats with the patience of a saint.

You are faced daily with interaction and growth opportunities galore.
It all depends on how you choose to utilize the time and opportunities that you have to increase the quality of your consciousness.

I think it is as simple as that.


OM
Jaymee
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Re: Book Three question about dead-ends

Post by Jaymee »

ObjectiveMind, thank you for your input. You're right, Tom says it's rare but qualifies that it happens to a "significant minority." It is perhaps this phrase that jumps out at me the most. I cannot accurately articulate why though. I am lucky enough to have ample opportunities and challenges daily that allow me to exercise the spiritual principles upon which I claim to live my life.

Ted, your response was most helpful. I think the "get permission" portion is what settled it for me. That would be what separates this position from a more traditional suicide (early termination of an experience packet), something Tom has posted in these forums as a definite no-no. I was having trouble understanding and reconciling these two positions.

While this dead-end scenario is not something I am personally struggling with, the question was not purely academic either. I have no sense or fear that this will happen to me or anyone I know but this particular bit makes me stop reading every time I make my way through the trilogy; I have a genuinely visceral reaction to this section in the books. Because of this atypical reaction I decided it was finally time to post a question about it. Thank you, again, for offering your insights.

Jaymee
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