Toms Diet

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daghda
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Toms Diet

Post by daghda »

Earlier this year I interviewed Tom for three hours on diet and related issues however, due to incessant technical problems that are beyond our control it has not been possible to get the interview up on you tube yet so I thought I would put some of the information on the forum.

Tom is and has been for a while now, on a restricted vegan diet.

When he was in Spain he suggested we read “Eat to Live” which I do believe his wife Dr. Knight had read and had suggested it to him.

http://www.amazon.com/Eat-Live-Amazing- ... 031612091X

Tom and Pamela use a vitamix high performance blender

https://www.vitamix.com/

We and several of my students who are also on the same diet bought it, reason being that it turns the green leaves into a very smooth drink and also brakes down the fibre so much that more nutriants are released.

This is the diet.

Breakfast and lunch consists of one half litre of macerated green leaves Spinach, Bok Choi, Lettuce and a couple of pieces of fruit.

This can be fruit of choice however; if you want a smooth blend I highly suggest mango and banana, but if you do not mind ‘microbits’ then you can add Pear, Apple, Pineapple, a small piece of lemon with rind...

To this you add a tablespoon of flax seeds – for the omega 3 - and 4 big chunks of ice, this is not something you want to drink warm.

Dinner is a big bowl of veggie soup with any kind of beans for extra protein.

Tom eats absolutely no animal protein what so ever, no salt, no caffeine, no alcohol and no sugar apart from the sugar in the fruit.

Tom makes up five days worth of the sludge in 1 litre jars and puts a huge bowl of the veggie stew in the refrigerator which he heats in the microwave to warm it for dinner.

The only veg he does not put in the stew is potato.

My mix for one litre of green smoothie is a pound of either spinach or bok choi sometimes mixed with dark lettuce leaves or rocket, half a mango, half a pineapple or one banana and a mango, 1tbl spoon of flax seeds, 4 large pieces of ice and mix until very smooth.

All the protein you need can be found in the green leaves and the beans as you will discover by reading the science behind this diet in "Eat to Live".

The first two weeks is a bit tricky because it detoxes the body and helps remove necrotic cells…so you feel a little rough.

Two months into it I wrote in my diary… “I cannot believe it, I feel as though I have been rejuvenated, I feel 30 - I am 57 -, my joints are not hurting at all, I walk differently, I feel brighter, more focused, more active, youthful, better attitude, optimised…”

Tom said that this is how he and Pamela felt which is why we decided to give it a whirl.

The stomach bag holds 1 litre…so, you fill it up in the morning, it takes 4 hours to digest the contents, then you fill it up again at lunchtime, digest again and then fill it up at dinner with a litre of delicious veggie stew.

We do not feel hungry in between and we had absolutely no sugar cravings at because the fruit we eat in the ‘green sludge’ takes care of that.

As well as this diet, to keep his body in tip top shape, Tom works out for two hours each day, five days a week by lifting weights.

We are on the diet right now and I am not lifting weights – yet – but am walking 3km a day and swimming around 300 meters in the afternoon, so if anyone wants to ask any questions I am happy to answer.

When we came off the diet we felt dreadful, sluggish, lacklustre and it was tough to get back on it again…

Also, for those interested in the effects of diet on consciousenss exploration, I have been able to access NPMR since I was a child, I have an audio connection with systems guidance and I was blown away by the increase in clarity of signal brought on by this diet.
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Man »

Any thoughts on:

- growing/storing vegetables/fruit
- super-market vegetables/fruit
- frozen vegetables/fruit

vs.

- concentrated supplements.

(Edit: I think the supplements I'm referring to are basically a dry-freezed version of that "sludge", with more ingredients, pressed into tablets, and taken with meals. I'm guessing it preserves the nutritional value much better than super-market vegetables, which are produced more for presentability than nutrition ...)
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by daghda »

Frozen fruit and veg are ok I do believe.

We did use only organic fruit and veg for a while but it is too difficult to source here so we switched to supermarket produce which is also much cheaper.

As I travelled a great deal to lecture and give programs I discovered that people all over the western world believe that supermarket veg has no nutritional value or that it is even poisonous and so generally speaking what I have been seeing is that people either tend to buy ready made meals so they do not have to think about the veg issue (even though the ready made food contains mass produced veg) and eat very little fruit or buy organic when they can.

You need to read ‘Eat To Live’ if you are interested in this kind of diet because the science behind eating this way is quite extraordinary. Supermarket veg has plenty of nutritional value and so is not quite as bad people imagine

We buy seven days worth of fruit and veg, leave the fruit out to ripen and keep the veg in the pantry.

I did start to cook the beans from scratch and freeze them but it was too time consuming so I buy bottles of beans or cans of organic beans when we can get them. The latter is salt free, the former has some salt so I soak and wash them before use.

We do not add any supplements as far as we can see there is no need as the physical results of the diet speak volumes.

What you are doing by eating a lb of green leaves , 4 pieces of fruit and a lb of veg a day is increasing the levels of micronutrients PER CALORIE in your diet whilst avoiding trans fats, sodium and other potentially toxic substances.

I hope this helps
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by s.lareck »

Thanks for posting this information, but I must say it sounds so *boring* to eat this every day.

I realize I'm letting my high entropy/animal roots show, but I feel like I need much more variation. I did give up meat a few months ago, so at least I'm not ravenously devouring flesh, but I still eat about 25 different kinds of food everyday.

I guess when you evolve your consciousness to your state, you live more for the non-physical realm, so the physical desires of eating are subservient to the non-physical intent of evolving consciousness? But don't you ever feel that animalistic pull to go back to your human/physical embodiment?

I am constantly feeling that pull, and not just with diet, but with sex, mind-altering substances, and even in my actions (e.g. wanting to be praised at work and at home, feeling smugly satisfied when people I don't like get their comeuppance etc., sometimes even having the desire to get in barfights like I did when I was in my early 20s.)

I guess all this is to say that I have a long, hard, high-entropy ego to beat if I ever want to be at the stage that I can drink nothing but smoothies and soup and exercise 2 hours a day and not feel like I am missing out on something "else." Because that is what my animal impulse tells my rational mind: you are missing out on something, so indulge! I don't mean to sabotage your nice thread with my confessions of a low quality IUOC, but just wanted to share what I thought when I read this.
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Man »

If it can be made both practical and tasty, it could be practical for a few days per week. It would feel strange for me to store raw "smoothied" vegetable soup for days, but the right ingredients could kept and blended for breakfast and lunch. Maybe kept in a cool-looking thermos for one day. It'd have to taste good.

I don't care about weight loss, so I guess fat or carbs isn't such a big worry. Oil and nuts still on the table.

I don't feel compelled to give up meat, eggs and dairy completely, but vegetable soup and smoothies in a thermos seems like a practical and clever solution.
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Sainbury »

I do freeze my veggie/fruit smoothie and it seems to reconstitute quite well. It is just too much trouble to make a little at a time for one person. I add soy poweder and blend it for a little more protein. I also haven't given up eggs, yogurt, and nuts.
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by bette »

I don't think the vegetable soup gets smoothied. Just the leaves and fruit drink. I need to get one of those mixers. What about sweet potatoes, I suppose those are out? I make a great tomato cabbage soup, I suppose I could leave those out. What about turnips and rutabagas?
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by daghda »

Correct Bette, the soup is not smoothied.

You can put just about anything you like into it except for potato and the beans need to be added for the extra protein.

You just get used to it, but as I say, when we came off it it was hard to get back on.

No, its not boring, your brain starts to crave for its nutrient rich diet so you really look forward to the smoothie, however it does take some time to tweek it to your liking and they are thick, so thick you can eat it with a spoon.

As far as cravings for the baddies, with consistent work on yourself, bootstrapping as Tom calls it, you slowly start to get over your desire for things that limit your experience. It's tough for sure but if you focus in the moment and try to have fun doing the best you can then it doesn't seem to hurt so much.

Recipe for soup
this lasts two of us around four days, 8 servings

4 large onions
1 medium califlower
1 Celery
1 pile of broccoli, two big handfuls
8 carrots
Three cans of beans (broad beans, Haricot Beans, Green Beans...what ever, you can mix them up)
2 Fennel
1 courgette
1 Aubergine
1 medium turnip - or ruterthingy, I can't remember what you call it in the states
4 Parsnips

Chop the lot, cover with water, bring to a boil then simmer for around an hour and Toms your Uncle, delicious and heartwarming not boring full of nutriant soup for champions...add more veggies if you start to run out and store this in a large bowl in the fridge.

You can also make one with a tomato base and sometimes Tom adds olives to this also.
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Lena »

bette wrote:I don't think the vegetable soup gets smoothied. Just the leaves and fruit drink. I need to get one of those mixers. What about sweet potatoes, I suppose those are out? I make a great tomato cabbage soup, I suppose I could leave those out. What about turnips and rutabagas?
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Bette,

you don't need to buy an expensive blender. I use Cuisinart Immersion Hand Blender If you have anyone with Costco membership, you can get it for $30 or so.

I have a big glass jar and this blender does a good job. I just add everything step by step, when with an expensive one you can put everything in at once.

According to some sources frozen fruits and veggies have as much nutrients, vitamins and minerals as fresh fruits and veggies.

Lena
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by daghda »

Yes, thank you Lena, I forgot to say that the reason we got the expensive blender is because we make smoothies en masse and we can throw everything in at once with a load of ice, also it makes the sludge velvety smooth which is better for me personally because I am not a fan of the bits...

So, of course the hand held will do just fine
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Justin »

Many thanks for the great info.

Edit:
daghda wrote:Also, for those interested in the effects of diet on consciousenss exploration, I have been able to access NPMR since I was a child, I have an audio connection with systems guidance and I was blown away by the increase in clarity of signal brought on by this diet.
I just remembered an OBE from a year or two ago in which, as I was struggling with getting unstuck from sleep paralysis / vibrational state, I heard a voice say, "beans will help lubricate this process." Maybe some of Uncle Tom's bean and veggie soup is just what the doctor ordered :)
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Bruno »

Thanks for the info. It's inspiring.

I have a question, though. What about vitamin b12? Wouldn't it be missed in that diet?

Thanks again.

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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Ted Vollers »

Here is an article on Vitamin B12 in the vegan diet. As you will see, "Neither plants nor animals make vitamin B12. Bacteria are responsible for producing vitamin B12." If you do a search for 'vegetarian sources of B12', you will find many more links. Ruminants can get B12 from their gut bacteria which are different from other kinds of animals gut bacteria. It is not clear from anything that I have read how they get the B12 into the nutritional yeast listed. It would appear to me that what is needed is a symbiosis between the bacteria that can produce the B12 and the yeast that takes it up. Or perhaps it would only require the appropriate bacteria in deactivated/killed form but still with active B12 within them to be added to the feed stock upon which the yeast is grown for the yeast to take it up, just as plants are said to sometimes take up B12 from the soil where it has been produced by bacteria. It would take more digging into this actual production cycle to find out where the B12 is coming from. That information is outlined in the extract from the third article listed below and apparently the answer to where to get B12 in your diet without animal products is to just take a supplement pill which involves culture grown bacteria as conscious creatures but not higher level animals and their products. Biosynthesis is the only practical way to produce B12. This is probably the source, supplementation, that puts the B12 into the yeast types mentioned, so why not just take the pill unless you have a desire to pay the price for the nutritional yeast which is not cheap?

Vitamin B12 in the Vegan Diet by Reed Mangels, PhD, RD from Simply Vegan 5th Edition
http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/b12.php
Summary: The requirement for vitamin B12 is very low, but it is essential. Non-animal sources include Red Star Vegetarian Support Formula or T-6635+ nutritional yeast (a little less than 1 Tablespoon supplies the adult RDA) and vitamin B12 fortified soy milk. It is especially important for pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children to have reliable sources of vitamin B12 in their diets.

Vitamin B12 is needed for cell division and blood formation. Neither plants nor animals make vitamin B12. Bacteria are responsible for producing vitamin B12. Animals get their vitamin B12 from eating foods contaminated with vitamin B12 and then the animal becomes a source of vitamin B12. Plant foods do not contain vitamin B12 except when they are contaminated by microorganisms or have vitamin B12 added to them. Thus, vegans need to look to fortified foods or supplements to get vitamin B12 in their diet. Although recommendations for vitamin B12 are very small, a vitamin B12 deficiency is a very serious problem leading ultimately to irreversible nerve damage. Prudent vegans will include sources of vitamin B12 in their diets. Vitamin B12 is especially important in pregnancy and lactation and for infants and children.

A number of reliable vegan food sources for vitamin B12 are known. One brand of nutritional yeast, Red Star T-6635+, has been tested and shown to contain active vitamin B12. This brand of yeast is often labeled as Vegetarian Support Formula with or without T-6635+ in parentheses following this name. It is a reliable source of vitamin B12. Nutritional yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a food yeast, grown on a molasses solution, which comes as yellow flakes or powder. It has a cheesy taste. Nutritional yeast is different from brewer’s yeast or torula yeast. Those sensitive to other yeasts can often use it.

The RDA for adults for vitamin B12 is 2.4 micrograms daily (1). About 2 rounded teaspoons of large flake Vegetarian Support Formula (Red Star T-6635+) nutritional yeast provides the recommended amount of vitamin B12 for adults (2). A number of the recipes in this book contain nutritional yeast.

Other sources of vitamin B12 are vitamin B12 fortified soy milk, vitamin B12 fortified meat analogues (food made from wheat gluten or soybeans to resemble meat, poultry, or fish), vitamin B12-fortified energy bars, and vitamin B12 supplements. There are vitamin supplements that do not contain animal products. We recommend checking the label of your favorite product since manufacturers have been known to stop including vitamin B12
Another such article is excerpted from next.

What Every Vegan Should Know About Vitamin B12 on the Vegan Society web site.
http://www.vegansociety.com/lifestyle/n ... n/b12.aspx
Vitamin B12 and vegan diets - Lessons from history

B12 is an exceptional vitamin. It is required in smaller amounts than any other known vitamin. Ten micrograms of B12 spread over a day appears to supply as much as the body can use. In the absence of any apparent dietary supply, deficiency symptoms usually take five years or more to develop in adults, though some people experience problems within a year. A very small number of individuals with no obvious reliable source appear to avoid clinical deficiency symptoms for twenty years or more. B12 is the only vitamin that is not recognised as being reliably supplied from a varied wholefood, plant-based diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables, together with exposure to sun. Many herbivorous mammals, including cattle and sheep, absorb B12 produced by bacteria in their own digestive system. B12 is found to some extent in soil and plants. These observations have led some vegans to suggest that B12 was an issue requiring no special attention, or even an elaborate hoax. Others have proposed specific foods, including spirulina, nori, tempeh, and barley grass, as suitable non-animal sources of B12. Such claims have not stood the test of time.

In over 60 years of vegan experimentation only B12 fortified foods and B12 supplements have proven themselves as reliable sources of B12, capable of supporting optimal health. It is very important that all vegans ensure they have an adequate intake of B12, from fortified foods or supplements. This will benefit our health and help to attract others to veganism through our example.
Finally, here is an excerpt from the Wikipedia article on vitamin B12 regarding its commercial production. Its production does not include recognizable animal sources to me. It would appear that simply taking a supplement containing B12 is the reliable, and least expensive way, to assure yourself of having the necessary B12 other than breaking your Vegan diet and eating the flesh of ruminants.
Synthesis and industrial production

Neither plants nor animals are independently capable of constructing vitamin B12.[41] Only bacteria and archaea[42] have the enzymes required for its biosynthesis. The total synthesis of B12 was reported by Robert Burns Woodward[43] and Albert Eschenmoser in 1972,[44][45] and remains one of the classic feats of organic synthesis. Species from the following genera are known to synthesize B12: Acetobacterium, Aerobacter, Agrobacterium, Alcaligenes, Azotobacter, Bacillus, Clostridium, Corynebacterium, Flavobacterium, Lactobacillus, Micromonospora, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Propionibacterium, Protaminobacter, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, Salmonella, Serratia, Streptomyces, Streptococcus and Xanthomonas.

Industrial production of B12 is through fermentation of selected microorganisms.[46] Streptomyces griseus, a bacterium once thought to be a yeast, was the commercial source of vitamin B12 for many years.[47][48] The species Pseudomonas denitrificans and Propionibacterium shermanii are more commonly used today.[49] These are frequently grown under special conditions to enhance yield, and at least one company, Rhône-Poulenc of France, which has merged into Sanofi-Aventis, used genetically engineered versions of one or both of these species. Since a number of species of Propionibacterium produce no exotoxins or endotoxins and are generally regarded as safe (have been granted GRAS status) by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States, they are presently the FDA-preferred bacterial fermentation organisms for vitamin B12 production.[50]

The total world production of vitamin B12, by four companies (the French Sanofi-Aventis and three Chinese companies) is said to have been 35 tonnes in 2008.[51] Most of this production is used as an additive to animal feed.[52]

See cyanocobalamin for discussion of the chemical preparation of reduced-cobalt vitamin analogs and preparation of physiological forms of the vitamin such as adenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin.
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by cantheman »

I lift heavy weights and would really like to experiment with a diet like this to see if you can gain mass as fast as you can if you are eating lots of meat and taking protein(dairy) supplements.
Why no Soy in this diet?
And could you please specify more specific the grams/pounds if you know them.
E.G. Breakfast is 200g of Spinach with 250 g of fruit and so on...

Thanks
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Re: Toms Diet

Post by Justin »

To add to Ted's list... the book Becoming Vegan is a a great source of seemingly objective information which includes the topic of B12. Many (most?) rice, hemp, and almond milks are supplemented with B12.

When people ask me what my sources of protein, iron, B12, etc are as a (mostly) vegan... I never actually say it, but I think to myself, "you should be asking what will my sources of heart disease and cancer be as a vegan." ;)

Having said that, there are certainly some things to consider with being a vegan, and B12 is one of them.
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